Category: interview

I Found a Job Through Social Media, My Campaign Worked!

After a month of running my social media campaign, I can finally say that I found a job.
The campaign was conducted through Facebook Ads,  Twitter #HireKate, and this website, of course.

The majob impact came from Facebook Ads.
Now I can tell everyone from personal experience that this thing actually works.
I chose simple Pay Per Click instead of Impressions, because I needed straight results and not just showing the advert. One of the great thing about FB Ads I found out was that they give you the price range, which changes everyday depending on impressions.
My average price per click was $0.27 – $0.24. So in total I spent just under $60 for running this Ad for 3 weeks, which includes my $38 voucher I got from Facebook.

These Ads absolutely worth the money and actually do have a real impact.
My estimated targeted audience was about 740 000 people in the UK, and in 3 weeks nearly 140 000 saw my Ad.
This is a small chart from FB.

And this are stats for this website. After starting running Ads, the average amount of views on my blog was 120 per day.

I paused Ads on weekends usually, as I though people would not have chance to react to them quickly in comparison to working days.
Also quick tip for anyone who considers doing something similar, CTR usually increased after 3pm every day and was very small in the morning. So in order to save  a bit of money start running Ads after lunch time, as it’s definitely the most effective time.

While, My  Twitter campaign didn’t bring as much response as FB Ads, however people still replied to it, when I was using relevant hush tags. For example

 

 

 

 

Twitter by itself is quite productive, however, while it is necessary to update it all the time, Facebook just runs Ads without any additional help. I think that presence on Twitter is extremely important, but for doing similar social media campaign FB and Twitter should be combined.

As a result of this campaign, I was invited to 7 job interviews with following 3 actual job offers. Companies simply contacted me via email and asked to come for an interview straightaway. So I didn’t even need to apply anywhere and fill in application forms.
Companies were very varied from traditional PR, small advertising companies to quite big ones and even company that produces online games.

Moreover, I got this sort of response on Twitter

 

 

 

 

Also my campaign got featured on
 Graduate Job Tips

Work Space

And other individual blogs.

Anyways, among all this interviews I decided to go with My Newsdesk. 

It’s a special platform where companies can create profiles and upload press releases, while journalists, bloggers and other interested people can follow them.

From the official website
“With journalistic and web backgrounds, the founders hit upon the idea of creating a platform that would increase engagement between companies and their most important influencers, such as journalists, bloggers and other opinion leaders. To put the relations back into PR was their mission. Companies should be able to create and share content and gain exposure to relevant information – on their own terms. Whether this exposure occurred on the company’s own website, or through other channels where their material was shared, Mynewsdesk would always be the source. This idea reflects the ongoing shift in the entire PR, media, and communications industry – from push to pull – or as we also like to see it: it’s time to enter the post-excel PR world.”

My Newsdesk

While, I’m going to start as an intern in the marketing department. Still the role is going to include extremely varied tasks, and this was probably the major thing for me. I wanted to find something special, which also has great potential. And I think My Newsdesk is just the place for me right now.

Therefore, I’m extremely excited to start this new job.
And I definitely recommend everyone who wants to work in advertising or some related industry to look for a job this social media way, as it is super rewarding and creative. And it does stand out from the crowd.

So now I guess I need to find another title for the blog, as I will continue writing about interesting adverts and post updates about my new job.

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Fairy Tails Help Crafting the Pitch

More thoughts on the lift pitch, but on the pitch in general. How to persuade clients they need this super revolutionary idea or a product.

FastCoDesign suggests to seek answer from an old fairy tail Jack and the Beanstalk. Jack’s mother asks him to sell a cow on the market, and on his way there he meets a witch or a radical change consultant.

“The witch does a great selling job on some magic beans. Why have coins, she argues, when you can have the infinite riches at the top of a magic beanstalk? Certainly it’s a step out of the comfort zone of subsistence dairy farming, but fable folk need to think bigger from time to time. Jack buys the witch’s pitch, sells the cow, and skips home triumphantly with the magic beans. His mother demands the coins, doesn’t buy the business transformation spiel, spanks Jack soundly, and sends him to bed without supper.”

The main point is that you can’t just pitch “magic bean” by itself straight away. It leaves businesses/clients confused, it leaves them with changes, which are usually represent fear of the unknown.

So the best way to pitch a brand new idea is through introducing “coins” first, something clients are already familiar, and only then describe all benefits of “magic beans”.

More FastCoDesign

Lift Pitch

Here is an extremely useful article about crafting a Lift Pitch.
It is especially useful for short interviews or perfect for recent graduate job at  Saatchi X, where 30 sec Lift Pitch is all you have.

I will definitely go and try my techniques for this position with a 30 sec while doing something crazy.

and for now

How To Craft A Job Search Elevator Pitch 

When Anita Attridge worked in human resources at Merck and Xerox, she frequently kicked off job interviews with a standard request: Tell me about yourself. A striking number of applicants couldn’t answer her coherently. “You’d get everything from, ‘Where do you want me to start?’ to their whole life story,” says Attridge, who is now a coach with The Five O’Clock Club, a career counseling firm.

“People screw it up all the time,” agrees Connie Thanasoulis-Cerrachio, a New York career coach who used to work in human resources at Merrill Lynch, Pfizer and Citigroup. “They think they should walk you through their entire résumé.” Instead, Thanasoulis-Cerrachio, Attridge and other career and communications pros agree, job seekers should be prepared with a 15- to 30-second “elevator pitch,” so-called because it should be so vivid and concise it could be delivered in the space of an elevator ride.

How do you sum up your life’s experience and job ambitions in 30 seconds or less? First of all, think about the benefit you can confer on the employer, advises Jane Praeger, a media coach who heads Ovid Inc., in New York City. “People are too apt to go in with a laundry list of skills–I can do this, I can do that,” she says. “Instead, say, for example, ‘I can make sure your employees are well supervised and motivated.’” Praeger’s own elevator pitch? “I help people figure out what to say and how to say it, to get the results they want.”

Thanasoulis-Cerrachio proposes the following strategy for crafting a pitch: Start by filling a whole page with what you would want to say to a hiring manager. Cut that down to half a page. Keep cutting until you get to a quarter page. Then pull out three bullet points that give a snapshot of your career.

Thanasoulis-Cerrachio’s pitch: “I spent 25 years on Wall Street heading up a staffing organization for Fortune 500 companies. Now I take those insider secrets and teach people how to run an efficient, effective job search.” Thanasoulis-Cerrachio, Praeger and Attridge agree that practice is essential. “Practice until it’s as easy as saying your name,” says Attridge. Always rehearse out loud, in front of a mirror, or to a friend or into a tape or video recorder. Force yourself to sound enthusiastic. Too often job candidates recite their pitches in a monotone or rush through them without passion. “Often the content is very good, but the delivery is so bad you don’t hear it,” Attridge notes.

Career coaches suggest preparing more than one pitch, for different audiences. Coach Win Sheffield recommends tailoring a specific one for each interview. “Develop your pitch with a specific person in mind,” he says, and make sure it includes where you’ve been, where you are and where you’re going.

It’s helpful to have a pitch designed to work in a social setting that doubles as a networking opportunity, such as a college reunion. In that kind of situation, Thanasoulis-Cerrachio advises, mix in personal details along with professional ones. For her that would mean something like, “I worked in corporate America for 25 years. I created my own business, and I absolutely love it. My husband and I built a home on Staten Island, and we just adopted a 180-pound mastiff.” Then see what your conversational partner picks up on.

As much when you’re selling yourself as at any other time, it’s important to pay attention to your audience. “The pitch is no substitute for developing a relationship with a person,” Sheffield notes.

Forbes