Category: writing

Back soon

I haven’t posted here for over a month now. That’s really bad and I need get back to this pretty soon.

I was just a bit busy with masters studies, but I will start blogging soon for sure.

While for now check out my new updated CV page.

“Start With Why” by Simon Sinek

I just wanted to share this new amazing, inspiring, eye-opening, and mind-blowing TED talk I’ve ever seen.

I came around it during the recent presentation of Mynewsdesk’s founder Kristofer Björkman, which he gave in order to inspire us, employees. Small part of it included short video from Simon Sinek’s talk on vision.

Simon talked about trust and how is it born. His main point is that trust emerges when people share common beliefs with others.
“When other people believe what we believe”, he says, then Trust emerges. And from here on, this is how great leaders inspire and great companies emerge with a vision. And then how people believe in this vision and buy their products.

In the second talk, Simon describes the Golden Circle. Again about believe and vision, but he points out the importance of the Why for companies, importance of the vision and the sense of purpose greater than just making profits. He states that when companies, like Apple, have a clear vision and say what they believe, then more customers are willing to relate to that and buy more products.

Anyway, these talks really inspired me and helped to view the world differently. Hope it will help some other people too.

Here I present you Simon Sinek’s talk “Start With Why”

 

And the Second “How Great Leaders Inspire Action”

 

Personal website

www.startwithwhy.com

 

I Found a Job Through Social Media, My Campaign Worked!

After a month of running my social media campaign, I can finally say that I found a job.
The campaign was conducted through Facebook Ads,  Twitter #HireKate, and this website, of course.

The majob impact came from Facebook Ads.
Now I can tell everyone from personal experience that this thing actually works.
I chose simple Pay Per Click instead of Impressions, because I needed straight results and not just showing the advert. One of the great thing about FB Ads I found out was that they give you the price range, which changes everyday depending on impressions.
My average price per click was $0.27 – $0.24. So in total I spent just under $60 for running this Ad for 3 weeks, which includes my $38 voucher I got from Facebook.

These Ads absolutely worth the money and actually do have a real impact.
My estimated targeted audience was about 740 000 people in the UK, and in 3 weeks nearly 140 000 saw my Ad.
This is a small chart from FB.

And this are stats for this website. After starting running Ads, the average amount of views on my blog was 120 per day.

I paused Ads on weekends usually, as I though people would not have chance to react to them quickly in comparison to working days.
Also quick tip for anyone who considers doing something similar, CTR usually increased after 3pm every day and was very small in the morning. So in order to save  a bit of money start running Ads after lunch time, as it’s definitely the most effective time.

While, My  Twitter campaign didn’t bring as much response as FB Ads, however people still replied to it, when I was using relevant hush tags. For example

 

 

 

 

Twitter by itself is quite productive, however, while it is necessary to update it all the time, Facebook just runs Ads without any additional help. I think that presence on Twitter is extremely important, but for doing similar social media campaign FB and Twitter should be combined.

As a result of this campaign, I was invited to 7 job interviews with following 3 actual job offers. Companies simply contacted me via email and asked to come for an interview straightaway. So I didn’t even need to apply anywhere and fill in application forms.
Companies were very varied from traditional PR, small advertising companies to quite big ones and even company that produces online games.

Moreover, I got this sort of response on Twitter

 

 

 

 

Also my campaign got featured on
 Graduate Job Tips

Work Space

And other individual blogs.

Anyways, among all this interviews I decided to go with My Newsdesk. 

It’s a special platform where companies can create profiles and upload press releases, while journalists, bloggers and other interested people can follow them.

From the official website
“With journalistic and web backgrounds, the founders hit upon the idea of creating a platform that would increase engagement between companies and their most important influencers, such as journalists, bloggers and other opinion leaders. To put the relations back into PR was their mission. Companies should be able to create and share content and gain exposure to relevant information – on their own terms. Whether this exposure occurred on the company’s own website, or through other channels where their material was shared, Mynewsdesk would always be the source. This idea reflects the ongoing shift in the entire PR, media, and communications industry – from push to pull – or as we also like to see it: it’s time to enter the post-excel PR world.”

My Newsdesk

While, I’m going to start as an intern in the marketing department. Still the role is going to include extremely varied tasks, and this was probably the major thing for me. I wanted to find something special, which also has great potential. And I think My Newsdesk is just the place for me right now.

Therefore, I’m extremely excited to start this new job.
And I definitely recommend everyone who wants to work in advertising or some related industry to look for a job this social media way, as it is super rewarding and creative. And it does stand out from the crowd.

So now I guess I need to find another title for the blog, as I will continue writing about interesting adverts and post updates about my new job.

Fairy Tails Help Crafting the Pitch

More thoughts on the lift pitch, but on the pitch in general. How to persuade clients they need this super revolutionary idea or a product.

FastCoDesign suggests to seek answer from an old fairy tail Jack and the Beanstalk. Jack’s mother asks him to sell a cow on the market, and on his way there he meets a witch or a radical change consultant.

“The witch does a great selling job on some magic beans. Why have coins, she argues, when you can have the infinite riches at the top of a magic beanstalk? Certainly it’s a step out of the comfort zone of subsistence dairy farming, but fable folk need to think bigger from time to time. Jack buys the witch’s pitch, sells the cow, and skips home triumphantly with the magic beans. His mother demands the coins, doesn’t buy the business transformation spiel, spanks Jack soundly, and sends him to bed without supper.”

The main point is that you can’t just pitch “magic bean” by itself straight away. It leaves businesses/clients confused, it leaves them with changes, which are usually represent fear of the unknown.

So the best way to pitch a brand new idea is through introducing “coins” first, something clients are already familiar, and only then describe all benefits of “magic beans”.

More FastCoDesign

Rebellious Ray Ban

New print and web campaign by Ray Bay takes people through different years or even eras.
It focuses on act of rebellion and rebels, of course, are wearing Ray Bans.
The campaign is very vivid and has a lot of action in. It brings out certain emotions, which I think are quite
hard to get out of people in print ads.

more at FastCoCreate

In the Process of Crafting a Lift Pitch

So I am still in the process of figuring out how to prepare a Lift Pitch for Saatchi X and what should it include.
Recently I posted an article from Forbes, which is very useful. But i tried to look for a little bit more research and came across an article from the Dumb Little Man Website.

Here are extremely useful tips

Why Is Having an Elevator Pitch So Important?

You only have 30-60 seconds to make a powerful first impression. The attention span of the average person is just 30 seconds before their mind starts wandering. The other reason is people have less time today. You need to grab them quickly or lose them forever.

Essential Elements of a Powerful Elevator Pitch Concise.

1. Concise. Your pitch should take no longer than 30-60 seconds.
2. Clear. Use language that everyone understands. Don’t use fancy words thinking it will make you sound smarter. Your listener won’t understand you and you’ll have lost your opportunity to hook them.
3. Powerful. Use words that are powerful and strong. Deliver the “Sis-Boom-Bang” to grab their attention!
4. Visual. Use words that create a visual image in your listeners mind. This will make your message memorable.
5. Tell a Story. A short story, that is. A good story is essentially this: someone with a problem either finds a solution or faces tragedy. Either type of story can be used to illuminate what you do.
6. Targeted. A great elevator pitch is aimed for a specific audience. If you have target audiences that are vastly different, you might want to have a unique pitch for each.
7. Goal Oriented. A kick-ass elevator pitch is designed with a specific outcome in mind. What is your desired outcome? You may have different pitches depending on different objectives. For instance do you want to: make a sale, gain a prospect, enlist support for an idea, or earn a referral.
8. Has a Hook. This is the element that literally snags your listener’s interest and makes them want to know more. This is the phrase or words that strike a chord in your listener.

It still continues with useful tips for the actual preparation process.

Here Dumb Little Man

Another Amazing article about preparing the Lift Pitch came out recently from the Huffington Post.

Although it mostly talked about same issues as everyone else, but they added 2 valuable point.

2. Your pitch needs to introduce your idea, not close the deal. What most expect to be a quick overview of your business can easily spin out of control as you try to encompass all of the so-called important facts about your story. Taking people from beginning to end will likely leave them overwhelmed with information, and generally uninterested. “All you are trying to do, and realistically all you can do, is try to draw the listeners into a conversation,” O’Leary. said “Give them a high-level overview of what you are talking about to see if that is something they are interested in. Only if they are interested should you start getting into the details.”

3. Don’t be afraid to toot your own horn. Bragging about how many tricks your dog can do gets annoying. Being proud about your record-breaking quarter is captivating. “It’s not bragging if it’s true and relevant,” O’Leary said. While many people feel self-conscious boasting about their business, it’s important to stress the successes of your business and show your confidence in the endeavor. “Many women in particular have a problem giving good elevator pitches because they have been taught not to brag,” O’Leary said. “As a result, their elevator pitches aren’t as compelling, or as credible, as they could be or need to be.”

Elevator Pitches: 5 Things You Need To Know